Ring Home Security Camera Users Raise Concerns Over Hacks

There’s never been a time like now where you can press a button and see someone across the world in the matter of seconds. Thanks to the Internet and smart devices we can communicate globally and instantaneously. That’s all good and well, but not good enough to forget about privacy. Remember, with the Internet and a smart device like a phone, tablet, or laptop, there are ways to access just about anything.

Personal Home Camera Security

Smart home security cameras have become increasingly popular among homeowners. You can attach a camera to your front door and see who’s there on your phone before opening it. In the case of an ambush, you’re safe because you can see that it’s not the pizza man. In general, home security cameras are a good idea.

But not all smart security systems are made equal or without flaw. The convenience of constant Internet connection to access these cameras is also its greatest weakness.

Home Invading Camera Hacks

As scary as it seems, hackers can access your systems and potentially spy on your as you go about your daily life. They can even speak to you through your system, scaring the bejesus out of you. The situation becomes even more significant if you use these cameras to keep an eye on someone like a child.

Usually, companies put security measures on your account to make it more difficult to hack. Think of signing into a Google account – every log in, even on your own computer, Google sends an alert to confirm that it was you. But Ring products don’t even do the bare minimum in protecting their users’ privacy.

In a test, Vox reporter, Joseph Cox, installed Ring cameras around his home and from across the world, his colleagues watched him get ready in real time without alerting Joseph at all. With just an e-mail and a password, especially ones that have previously been breached, anyone can watch you through your “security” camera.

It’s not just Ring products, but others as well that are easily compromised and have caused significant concerns to users. Hackers access Ring cameras and watch people go about their day and some even started a podcast where they laugh about what they see. And the possibilities are endlessly creepy like someone hacking a camera in a child’s room and be watching them without anyone knowing.

Ring’s Response

After a wave of headlines concerning Ring products security that included a hacker taunting a child, the Amazon-owned company made a statement. And it was not helpful at all. Instead, the company blamed users for not following “security best practices.” This was referring to the option that users have to set up a two-step authentication log in, which only makes it slightly more difficult to hack.

The problem is that a giant company like Amazon didn’t put in any safeguards into its product. All the while selling these easily-hackable cameras to thousands across the country. For a billion-dollar company, users are wondering why no security measures were implemented into their products.